Letters to Editor, Opinion

LETTER: Show the good with the bad at Agganis

For every Terriers’ home game, I saunter over to Agganis Arena to watch our men’s hockey team take on whoever else happens to be on the ice. While I would like to say that the Terriers are always the most talented group on the ice, there are points in the game when this isn’t the case. At these points, the other team has likely scored, or perhaps the Terriers have been given a penalty. In either case, if I so much as sneezed when the event occurred, I will never see what happened. One might find that concept strange, given that there is a large, expensive Jumbotron dangling from the arena’s rafters, but that’s how it is.
I can’t be the only one that finds it absolutely ridiculous that no replays that show bad things happening to the Terriers are ever displayed on the big screen. Frankly, I don’t understand it. Is it because the university is afraid the fans will get angry having to see the puck go in again? As a hockey fan, it’s just insulting. Fans like to see good goals, regardless of who scores them. Obviously, it’s preferred when the Terriers are putting the puck in the net, but of course, that’s not always the case.
I distinctly remember James van Riemsdyk scoring a positively outrageous goal for the University of New Hampshire, but I’ll never know how he got the puck past Brian Strait and Brett Bennett, because a replay was never shown. I also remember Eric Gryba taking a penalty ‘-‘- actually, I remember him taking lots of penalties ‘-‘- but some of them weren’t immediately obvious. Unfortunately, I’ll never know precisely what it was that he did; there was never a replay.
To whoever runs the pretty screen that hangs above the rink, please show highlights for both sides. We won’t get mad because we have to watch the goal again ‘-‘- it’s part of the game. We understand.

Chase Ansok
SAR ’10

One Comment

  1. Saul Morgenstern, SED '74

    Chase — I agree entirely. We always want the Terriers to score, and win. But real fans want to see everything — the good, the bad and the ugly.